The Philippine Journal of Fisheries





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Research Article   |   25 Jan 2023

Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment of the Eel Fishery in Aparri, Cagayan, Philippines

Jennifer T. Tattao, Isagani P. Angeles, Evelyn C. Ame*

The global glass eel population is continuously declining over the years. Apart from the anthropogenic factors, the global production decline suggests that the changing climatic condition may have influenced its downtrend.





Publications


Research Article 

A Study on Postharvest Losses in Fisheries Owing to Changes in Market Supply and Demand in the Philippines

Market patterns and conditions can affect the economic value of fishery commodities; hence, they can contribute to postharvest losses.


 

Age, Growth, and Population Structure of Conomurex luhunuas

Age and growth dynamics of Conomurex luhuanus were investigated to determine the population structure.


MPA-FishMApp – A Citizen Science App That Simplifies Monitoring of Coral Reef Fish Density and Biomass in Marine Protected Areas

Monitoring changes in fish density and biomass inside marine protected areas (MPAs) through fish visual census (FVC) can determine if MPAs are achieving their goal of promoting fish population recovery.


Updates on Identification and Distribution of the River Mullet “Ludong” in Northern Philippines

“Ludong”, also known as the president’s fish, is a river mullet known to be found in Cagayan River, Northern Philippines. Unfortunately, this species has been heavily exploited over the years.


Correlation of Chlorophyll-a and Dissolved Oxygen in the Phytoplankton Abundance in Leyte Gulf, Philippines

Leyte Gulf is an important fishing ground in the Philippines that serves as a livelihood and food source for many coastal communities.


Status of Sea Cucumber Fisheries in Mindanao: Harnessing Local Knowledge in Determining Diversity and Production Values

Sea cucumber fishery is a significant livelihood in the Philippines; however, overexploitation and inadequate management programs resulted in the decline of various sea cucumber species.


First Report on the Reproductive Biology of the Redtail Scad Decapterus kurroides Bleeker, 1855 in Iligan Bay, Southern Philippines

This study provided the first report on the reproductive biology of the redtail scad, Decapterus kurroides.


Policy Brief 

Harmful Jellyfishes are Manageable

Key Points:

  • Very little is known about harmful jellyfish species in the Philippines, much less about their impacts on society (e.g., fishing and tourism sectors, local community).
  • The Department of Agriculture - Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (DA-BFAR), Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), Departments of Health (DOH) and Tourism (DOT) together with the Department of Science and Technology – Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development (DOST-PCAARRD), other research institutions and academe, should conduct more research related to harmful jellyfish species to address the paucity in information.
  • To reduce injuries and deaths resulting from harmful jellyfish envenomation, DA, DENR, DOH, and DOT, and their counterparts in local governments must strengthen their information and education campaigns, preventive measures, emergency response, and treatment of jellyfish-related injuries and stings.
  • DA-BFAR should monitor box and other harmful jellyfishes in collaboration with the local governments with high coastal tourism traffic. This monitoring should be made participatory in high tourism-traffic areas, involving members of the public, the fisheries, tourism, and health sectors of the local governments in coordination with local academic institutions.
  • DA-BFAR and DENR should also maintain a publicly available database of jellyfish envenomation dates, times, and locations. Health workers and law enforcement officials should be taught to recognize the stings and record casualties for the DA-BFAR and DENR databases. This database and monitoring could be the basis for a national risk map and calendar and, eventually, an advisory and warning system.


 

Deployment of Artificial Habitats Alone Cannot Make up for the Degradation of Coral Reefs

Key Points:

  • Artificial habitat projects are expensive endeavors that should be carefully designed and planned to be sustainable and effective.
  • Artificial habitats must be implemented with other fisheries enhancement and management measures and be monitored to allow for future improvements in site selection criteria and design.
  • Coral reef rehabilitation is much more expensive than protection.
  • Given the considerable cost and effort involved, artificial habitat deployments are justified in only a few situations. The lessons shared in this brief contain recommendations for the review and amendment of the joint memorandum concerning the use and management of artificial reefs.